« backDeep Fried Egg!

Hello All,

I hope you are off to a great day.

You think you love your regular fried egg? Wait until you try it deep-fried!

Per egg:

½ C Panko breadcrumbs (or any kind you like)

1 tsp herbs de Provence (or herbs or spices of your choice) Try cumin/chile powder or fennel seed and finely chopped salami!

Set-up:

1 pot large enough to hold the number of eggs you want to cook with 3” of canola oil

1 sauté pan large enough to hold the number of eggs you want to cook.

1 slotted spoon

1 folder paper towel or towel

Fill sauté pan 2” from the top with water. Add 1 tsp of salt and 1 tsp of rice, apple or white vinegar. Bring to just under a boil.

Heat the oil over medium heat in the pot.

On a large plate mix the breadcrumbs and herbs together.

Crack the eggs into the water and cook for 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon lift them out and blot them on the paper towel to remove most of the water. They will not be fully cooked at this point.

Gently set the egg in the breadcrumbs and cover with breadcrumbs. Gently lift the egg up and gently lower into oil (oil is ready when a breadcrumb dropped into the oil sizzles.

Fry for 45 seconds until golden. Lift egg out with a dry slotted spoon.

Serve over salad, English muffin, a BLT or just about any way you like.

Feed the hungry by making a pledge (no cost) to eat good. Do good every day.  America’s egg farmers are donating up to one million eggs to feed the hungry.

Eat well, Enjoy life, Be happy!

3 Responses to “Deep Fried Egg!”

  1. Chase Lane says:

    Hi Jeffrey. Love this video. I’ve deep-fried eggs before, but it was always to make use of whatever flour or bread crumbs I had left. Love your video, with a new way for me to do it, making more of an entree out of it.

    I was going to write after I did some ribs with your Indian spice that I rubbed into the meat. I then coated it with brown gravy powder. So, the meat takes on the Indian flavor, yet the outside has a carmelized coating. I do this with beef, too. As I mentioned before, I used your Mexican spice with my barbecue sauce. Was going to do it again, before I went totally psycho and used your Chinese spice in my bbq sauce. I couldn’t believe it! I finally understand when you and other chefs talk about flavors bouncing off every side of your mouth. I had added a couple crumbs of Anise, as well. It might have already been in your ingredients, but I was totally flaking out and not responsible for any morsel that wound up on a plate. All great things must be able to be duplicated, so I did it again with the same bounce in my mouth and excitement on the tongue. I cannot believe how well that spice mix goes with barbecue sauce. Totally love it.
    Oh, your Italian spices came to the door (not kidding) as I was wondering what to spice my soup with. Another victory for a Jeffrey fan!! I cooked three times last week and your spices were in each meal, sometimes more than one in a dish.
    I can’t walk yet( been over 8 months since I’ve even gotten outside0, but if I am able, I will bust all five of my butts to get to see you when you come to Saint Louis. You’re truly a chef to be thought and talked about.
    Love to you and Family.
    Chase
    PS, though I’ve already said I love the spice tins, they also help me by being able to be put in an easy access space for me.

  2. Chase Lane says:

    Sorry about the repost, but that white area got in the way of the first one
    Chase Lane says:
    October 25, 2011 at 2:38 pm
    Hi Jeffrey. Love this video. I’ve deep-fried eggs before, but it was always to make use of whatever flour or bread crumbs I had left. Love your video, with a new way for me to do it, making more of an entree out of it.

    I was going to write after I did some ribs with your Indian spice that I rubbed into the meat. I then coated it with brown gravy powder. So, the meat takes on the Indian flavor, yet the outside has a carmelized coating. I do this with beef, too. As I mentioned before, I used your Mexican spice with my barbecue sauce. Was going to do it again, before I went totally psycho and used your Chinese spice in my bbq sauce. I couldn’t believe it! I finally understand when you and other chefs talk about flavors bouncing off every side of your mouth. I had added a couple crumbs of Anise, as well. It might have already been in your ingredients, but I was totally flaking out and not responsible for any morsel that wound up on a plate. All great things must be able to be duplicated, so I did it again with the same bounce in my mouth and excitement on the tongue. I cannot believe how well that spice mix goes with barbecue sauce. Totally love it.
    Oh, your Italian spices came to the door (not kidding) as I was wondering what to spice my soup with. Another victory for a Jeffrey fan!! I cooked three times last week and your spices were in each meal, sometimes more than one in a dish.
    I can’t walk yet( been over 8 months since I’ve even gotten outside0, but if I am able, I will bust all five of my butts to get to see you when you come to Saint Louis. You’re truly a chef to be thought and talked about.
    Love to you and Family.
    Chase
    PS, though I’ve already said I love the spice tins, they also help me by being able to be put in an easy access space

    • Jeffrey Saad says:

      Hello Chase, Always great to hear from you and feel your passion! Thanks much. You are so right about the Chinese. The Szechuan peppercorn is the fuse in that blend. It actually has a slight numbing effect on the tongue but seems to open up the taste buds so all the other flavors can pour in. Well done. Take care and thanks again. Best, Jeffrey

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